Author: NLBO

2022 NBA free agency rumors: Live updates as Zach Lavine, Bulls agree on max deal; Kevin Durant requests trade – CBS Sports

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The 2021-22 season and NBA Draft are both in the books, and now all eyes are on the start of free agency. The speculation and rumors that surround free agency are what make this time of the year truly entertaining. This summer may not have some of the biggest names available on the free-agent market, but it’s still going to be a hectic offseason. Hours before free agency officially kicked off, Kevin Durant requested a trade away from the Brooklyn Nets . One of the NBA’s biggest superstars is now set to change teams this summer, and KD’s trade request will undoubtedly impact how teams handle their offseason business.

NBA free agency started Thursday at 6 p. m. ET, when teams could start negotiating deals with players. However , contracts won’t actually be official until the moratorium period is lifted on July 6. The NBA has reportedly told teams that the salary cap for next season is projected to be set at $123. 6 million, up $11. six million from last year’s $112 million cap figure.   Zach LaVine   (Bulls) and Bradley Beal (Wizards) both agreed on max deals to return to their respective teams. A number of top names are already off the board, including Jalen Brunson, who reportedly agreed to the four-year, $104M deal with the New York Knicks.

More on free agency: Top available gamers | FA Tracker   | Day 1 winners plus losers

Follow below for all the latest deals, updates and more as NBA free agency continues in Day 2 .

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2022 NBA free agency rumors: Live updates as Kevin Durant requests trade; Jalen Brunson to sign with Knicks – CBS Sports

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The 2021-22 season and NBA Draft are both in the books, and now all eyes are on the start of free agency. The speculation and rumors that surround free agency are what make this time of the year truly entertaining. This summer may not have some of the biggest names available on the free-agent market, but it’s still going to be a hectic offseason. Hours before free agency officially kicked off, Kevin Durant requested a trade away from the Brooklyn Nets. One of the NBA’s biggest superstars is now set to change teams this summer, and KD’s trade request will undoubtedly impact how teams handle their offseason business.

NBA free agency started Thursday at 6 p.m. ET, when teams could start negotiating deals with players. However, contracts won’t actually be official until the moratorium period is lifted on July 6. The NBA has reportedly told teams that the salary cap for next season is projected to be set at $123.6 million, up $11.6 million from last year’s $112 million cap figure. Zach LaVine and Deandre Ayton are among the top unrestricted free agents available this offseason. A number of names are already off the board, including Jalen Brunson, who reportedly agreed to a four-year, $110M deal with the New York Knicks.

More on free agency: Top available players | FA Tracker | Day 1 winners and losers

Follow below for all the latest deals, updates and more as NBA free agency continues in Day 2.

Categories: books

The Court vs. the Climate – The New York Times

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The Supreme Court seems unconcerned with climate change.

The Supreme Court has made it harder for the country to fight the ravages of climate change.

In a 6-to-3 decision yesterday, the court limited the Environmental Protection Agency’s ability to prevent power plants from releasing climate-warming pollution. The court ruled that Congress had not given the agency the authority to issue the broad regulations that many climate experts believe could make a major difference — the kind of regulations that many Biden administration officials would have liked to implement.

Today’s newsletter will walk you through what the decision means — and also clarify what it does not mean (because some of the early commentary exaggerated the decision’s meaning). The bottom line is that the ruling is significant, but it does not eliminate the Biden administration’s ability to reduce greenhouse gas pollution.

Amy Westervelt, a climate journalist, summarized the decision by writing: “Not good, but also not as bad as it could have been. It’s pretty narrow.” Romany Webb of the Sabin Center for Climate Change Law at Columbia University called the ruling “a blow, but it is nowhere near the worst-case scenario.”

The trouble, many scientists say, is that climate change presents such an enormous threat to the world — and the need to reduce the pace of warming is so urgent — that any ruling that makes the task harder is worrisome. Extreme storms, heat waves, droughts and wildfires are already becoming more common. Some species are facing potential extinction. Glaciers are melting, and sea levels are rising.

Yet the U.S. has made only modest progress combating climate change through federal policy in recent years. The Trump administration largely denied the problem and reversed Obama administration policies intended to slow global warming. The Biden administration has failed to pass its ambitious climate agenda because of uniform Republican opposition and Democratic infighting. Now the Supreme Court has made the job more difficult, too.

The Biden administration had hoped to issue a major rule requiring electric utilities to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, essentially forcing them to replace coal and gas-fired plants with clean forms of electricity, like wind, solar and nuclear. The justices ruled that when Congress passed the Clean Air Act in 1970, it did not intend to give the E.P.A. such broad authority.

Kendrick Brinson for The New York Times

The E.P.A. can still regulate power plants after the ruling, but more narrowly than before: The agency can push power plants to become more efficient, for example. “The way to significantly reduce greenhouse emissions from power plants is to shut down the power plants — and replace them with something cleaner,” my colleague Coral Davenport said. “And that’s off the table.”

After yesterday, the E.P.A.’s most significant policy tools appear to involve other industries. The agency can still regulate greenhouse gases from vehicles, the nation’s largest source of such emissions — although the ruling and the potential for future lawsuits may make the agency more cautious than it otherwise would be.

On Twitter, Michael Gerrard, an environmental law expert at Columbia University, listed other ways that government agencies could continue to address climate change, including: federal rules applying to newly built power plants; federal rules on leakage from oil and gas production; state and local rules in many areas; and private sector efforts to become more energy efficient, often subsidized by the government.

“One battle is lost (unsurprisingly, given this Supreme Court),” Gerrard wrote, “but the war against climate change very much goes on.”

T.J. Kirkpatrick for The New York Times

The ruling is the latest sign that the Republican Party is unconcerned about climate change. The six justices in the majority were all Republican appointees; the three dissenters were all Democratic appointees.

Adam Liptak, The Times’s Supreme Court correspondent, wrote: “Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., writing for the majority, only glancingly alluded to the harms caused by climate change. Justice Elena Kagan began her dissent with a long passage detailing the devastation the planet faces, including hurricanes, floods, famines, coastal erosion, mass migration and political crises.”

The math just got harder. This decision made it less likely that the U.S. would reach the climate targets that Biden has set. And if the U.S. misses its targets, the world will likely miss its target, as The Times’s Climate Forward newsletter explains. (Sign up here.)

Cities and states are trying to fill the gap. Local governments are accelerating their efforts to cut greenhouse gas emissions, in some cases bridging partisan divides.

More lawsuits may be coming. Many of the plaintiffs from this climate case have brought a case trying to keep the E.P.A. from moving the nation toward a greater use of electric vehicles.

The ruling may matter beyond climate policy. Corporations in other industries will likely use this ruling to argue that some of their own regulations should also be blocked.

Erin Schaff/The New York Times

Plan A to protect abortion rights is for Democrats to win enough seats to codify Roe. There doesn’t seem to be a Plan B, says Michelle Goldberg.

Laura Adkins is a New York liberal. She wants a gun.

It’s reckless for Democrats to boost Trumpist candidates in G.O.P. primaries, David Brooks writes.

Trilobites: Who’s got two pseudothumbs and loves to eat bamboo? This bear.

Vacation stress: How to handle this summer’s air travel mess.

Modern Love: For $100, could he stop flirting with men when his mother was around?

A Times classic: A home-maintenance checklist.

Advice from Wirecutter: Campfire cooking tips.

Lives Lived: As the face of the Hells Angels, Sonny Barger turned the motorcycle club into a global phenomenon and an emblem of West Coast rebellion. He died at 83.

A programming note: This week, we are introducing a new section to this newsletter — a sports section, written by the staff of The Athletic.

An N.B.A. superstar wants out: Kevin Durant asked to be traded from the Brooklyn Nets yesterday, a fresh story line to pair with the league’s free agency period kicking off. Where could Durant land? Here are the possible trade destinations.

U.C.L.A. and U.S.C. sow chaos: Two Pac-12 mainstays are leaving for the Big Ten. It’s a move that shakes college football’s foundation. Is the sport now down to just two power conferences?

Marla Hooch can still rake: It’s been 30 years since she was launching home runs for the Rockford Peaches in “A League of Their Own.” Turns out the actress Megan Cavanagh, now 61, can still hit ’em.

The Athletic, a New York Times company, is a subscription publication that delivers in-depth, personalized sports coverage. Learn more about The Athletic.

Netflix

Maybe not all shows need second seasons — but many get one anyway. “The philosophy today is that if you can give people more of what they liked, then don’t waste time pondering whether you should,” the TV critic James Poniewozik writes.

“Only Murders in the Building,” which told a full story in its first season, returned this week. Other seemingly complete shows have also returned: “Big Little Lies,” “The Flight Attendant,” “Russian Doll.” The second season of “Only Murders” still delivers even if it lacks originality, James writes.

Johnny Miller for The New York Times

This baked spinach-artichoke pasta nixes cream cheese for salty Parmesan and heavy cream.

The documentary “Hallelujah” is illuminating for die-hard and casual fans of Leonard Cohen.

Books coming in July include a biography of Vladimir Putin and a novel by Bolu Babalola.

The hosts discussed the Supreme Court.

Find out how well you kept up with the headlines this week.

The pangram from yesterday’s Spelling Bee was enviable. Here is today’s puzzle.

Here’s today’s Mini Crossword, and a clue: Push (oneself) (five letters).

And here’s today’s Wordle. After, use our bot to get better.


Thanks for spending part of your morning with The Times. See you tomorrow. — David

P.S. Nice choice of reading material, Mr. President (from the G7 meeting in Germany):

Kenny Holston for The New York Times

Here’s today’s front page.

The Daily” is about abortion. On the Modern Love podcast, two adoption stories.

Claire Moses, Ian Prasad Philbrick, Tom Wright-Piersanti and Ashley Wu contributed to The Morning. You can reach the team at [email protected].

Sign up here to get this newsletter in your inbox.

Categories: books

Summer Reading Challenge 2022 – Hertfordshire County Council

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Categories: books

The interiors life: how writers use decor to draw fictional characters – Financial Times

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What says more about us than our homes and how we feel about them? Do you hang your clothes up on the floor? Do you fling open the fridge, not from hunger but in search of fresh ideas? Perhaps you secretly thrill to lights left on as a bullish affront to your impecunious youth. Or are you the one who proudly switches them off and fell in the dark that time and broke your arm?

Like Oscar Wilde you find it increasingly hard to live up to your blue china, of course you do. You admit your love of grey and green is an homage to Babar. You seem to have acquired a picture recently, to impress someone who died 11 years ago. And that chair you never sit in because it’s too good for you . . . does it just need to meet the right person? “You know how some people put a chair or a table in a corner where it looks nice but nobody in the world is ever going to go over to it, let alone sit down there? Violet didn’t do that,” wrote Toni Morrison in Jazz. OUCH.

Perhaps your home torments you like a withholding parent in a novel by Henry James. There may be awful parts that disgrace you. That half-empty hummus pot, with teeth marks, in the fruit bowl . . . You hang your head when the heavens open, cursing the spiteful rain because the roof will leak and where’s the money for repairs? You remember the disdain with which your grandmother scolded you for sitting down to peel potatoes when you were nine and recollect that you’ve hardly sat down since. And when you gaze upon your poor old skirting, cracked and split, do you shudder as you see the thousands of flaws you possess yourself reflected?

All homes are haunted. They are haunted by our childhoods when our first ideas of home were formed, by the ghosts of our parents and their inclinations, values and dislikes, their generous impulses as well as their occasional sharp practice. (Did your mother sometimes smash plates in desperation? Did your father really drop someone because he used the word “mishmash”?)

Our homes may be shadowed by the things we’re en route to, or escaping from, murky with the parallel lives we might have led had things gone better or not worked out so well. Think of the muted interiors, mansion flats in the main, where the heroines of Anita Brookner try to gain mastery over their ruinous feelings. A friend routinely teases her daughters about her other family down the road, the three little boys in descending sizes who think the world of her and are chatty and appreciative. The daughters roll their eyes and frown, but they’ve raised their game.

© Helen Marcus/Contact Press Images

At certain points in life — teenage especially — home may be the enemy, holding us back, repelling us and reeling us in maddeningly. That’s not what was promised in Goodnight Moon. It almost seems to go against our grain. The sudden crashing sentimentality of the felt tip height marks! Home can also be a safe place to be our worst selves, absorbing iterations of our personalities wholly unrecognisable to those who know only our public side.

Also, what makes people leave?

None of this, of course, is lost on novelists. I’m often struck by the way writers use interior details to furnish us with insights into their characters.

I’m always looking for new ideas myself in this regard. When building and decorating dwellings for the people in the books I write, I often think of home in terms of compensation for the indignities of childhood. What in the characters’ current set of circumstances are they trying to improve, correct or cancel out from their past? Both pride and shame have always been great drivers of taste. (It pleases me that in his Seven Ages of Man speech from As You Like It, Shakespeare declares “taste” the last thing to go.)

‘Interior II’, 1964, by Richard Hamilton
‘Interior II’, 1964, by Richard Hamilton © Tate Images © R Hamilton. All Rights Reserved, DACS 2022

In my latest novel, Loved and Missed, there are two women, both English teachers, one well-off, one poor, both struggling. One likes the heating cranked up to the highest setting, leaving her guests’ skin parched, stretched taut round the hairline, dry of eye, chapped of lip. But she was freezing for her entire childhood and she is NOT going to be cold now. Heat is life. Heat is love. Her flat is furnished like a prosperous retirement home, treats factored into the day according to the clock: morning coffee ceremonies, teatime Swiss rolls with near-fluorescent synthetic cream, gin and tonic routines as early as is decent. She likes those lap trays with little cushions on their undersides which are sometimes on sale in department stores.

The other woman, her colleague, is more floor-boardish by nature, constitutionally frugal — from a point of view of style as well as means. A little apricot jam in a teacup is her idea of a spree. In winter, she sleeps in her tights to save on bills. “How could you?!” her radiator-mad friend exclaims. Both are convalescing from disappointment, desperate for a bit of human warmth, employing trial and error in their attempts to achieve it.

My English teacher, Mrs Richards, made much of the modest accoutrements of the bedsit in Larkin’s poem “Mr Bleaney”: “Bed, upright chair, sixty-watt bulb” — the leanest of companions, an eight-syllable home kit of the most basic sort. “But what if Bleaney had been perfectly happy in this setting?” she said. What if he didn’t lie on said bed, bemoaning the fact “that how we live measures our own nature”, as the narrator does. There’s a kind of innocence to these items — they don’t have pretensions. It’s all very honest. There’s dignity there. Perhaps the narrator of the poem is most appalled that Mr Bleaney appears to have been content in his setting. What a betrayal!

© Camera Press/Rogers/RBO

Compare Bleaney’s bleak furnishings with Lionel Croy’s more undermining, morale-threatening rooms in Henry James’s The Wings of the Dove, as seen through his daughter’s eyes. While she waits for her father, Kate moves “from the shabby sofa to the armchair upholstered in a glazed cloth that gave at once — she had tried it — the sense of the slippery and of the sticky. She had looked at the sallow prints on the walls and at the lonely magazine, a year old, that combined, with a small lamp in coloured glass and a knitted white centrepiece wanting in freshness . . . ”

Everything about this room is compromising, and so it is with Lionel Croy. This is a father built from pretext, prevarication and deceit. Soon James confirms it: “there was never a mistake for you that he could leave unmade”. That “unmade” — an adjective almost always pertaining to beds — brilliantly suggests that the disappointments afforded by this man are performed with the deliberate regularity of domestic chores. It’s probably my favourite first chapter of any book.

Sometimes characters in novels are so entirely shaped by their homes that the rooms and routines that have formed them have become absorbed into their bodies, the interior world and the world of interiors dovetailing nicely. They carry the grand ceiling heights or the horror of the unwanted visitor with them, wherever they go.

In The Confusions of Young Törless, Robert Musil’s astonishing first novel, a young prince arrives at the Austro-Hungarian military school so thoroughly representing his background that the “aura of devotional practices and the silence of an old aristocratic castle seemed somehow to linger around the prince . . . walking erect through a suite of empty halls, where anyone else would seem to bump into unseen corners”.

© Design Pics Inc/Shutterstock

In Mother’s Milk, the greatest of Edward St Aubyn’s Patrick Melrose novels, this sense of home and body as one takes on a more surreal edge. After sending off his gravely ill mother’s application to become a member of Dignitas, Patrick “stubbornly refused to get involved with his emotions, letting panic and elation and solemnity lean on the doorbell while he only glanced at them from behind closed curtains, pretending not to be at home”.

Of course, love as well as panic can be woven into soft furnishings.

Recently, the curtains in Monica Ali’s novel Love Marriage stopped me in my . . . tracks: “Ma made them when Yasmin was about ten years old. Blue with sprigs of jasmine, the state flower of West Bengal. The curtains were too short when she hung them first so she’d let down the hem like a pair of overgrown trousers, and every moonlit night the light shone through the pinpricks.”

The jasmine-patterned material for the curtains in Yasmin’s room, combined with the mistake in the sizing, the simple solution, the charming sense of the window having grown, like another child, and then the lovely light turning what might have been a disaster into something magical, makes this window treatment itself feel like a lullaby.

I love scenes of hoarding in a novel — clutter is such fertile ground for secrets — and Yasmin’s house in Love Marriage is impressive in this respect as “stuff grew like mushrooms in a damp dark wood”. I often think of the mother in Laurie Lee’s Cider with Rosie, filling the “crannies of her life with a ballast of wayward objects”. Her clutter is distinguished and theatrical: “Two decades of news­papers, yellow as shrouds . . . chair-springs, boot-lasts, sheets of broken glass, corset-bones, picture frames, fire dogs, top hats, chess-men, feathers, and statues without heads . . . ”.

© Steven May/Alamy

I also collect good fictional storage. Anne’s cupboards in Candia McWilliam’s distinguished first novel A Case of Knives stray beyond glamour into the carpentry sublime: “tall lozenges of space, obscure and cool”, affording “the absolute control of passion by ritual”. Anne Tyler is skilled at the placing of things to indicate grave states of mind. A widower in Tyler’s Ladder of Years steadies himself by drawing a map of the contents of his home. The section pertaining to the coffee table heartbreakingly reads, “Large paperweight, small paperweight, magazines.” Yet this order is skin-deep, for in his cupboards “pans with scorched bottoms” and “dish towels with big charred holes” are stashed.

Clutter’s modish nemesis — the grand clear-out or rationalisation scene — can also bring delight on the page. The best recent example of this occurs in Gwendoline Riley’s excellently tart novel My Phantoms. A daughter sets about dismantling her mother’s lifework:

“It was attention; being fussed over . . . It would cheer me up too. I’d grown up surrounded by shit, and I always enjoyed getting rid of it . . . We quickly established that though she could try to make a case for items I’d condemned, I wasn’t going to have it, and that was all part of the fun! . . . Here, for example were four tatty black handbags . . . that crate of magazines and tangled tights . . . rationalise your tote bags . . . we can keep the ones that are a useful size, and the ones that are conversation starters . . . cough medicine . . . dried out old mister men plasters . . . yellowish tincture I used to paint on the warts around my fingernails”.

Clutter is unfashionable just now, but at a recent memorial service I was heartened to hear of a woman who kept a box labelled “Pieces of string too short for use”. An acute interior detail of that calibre can be mesmerising on or off the page, changing in an instant how you view a character. When Anita Brookner — shockingly — refers to a young woman despairing at the “brutal” smell coming from the bathroom after a man has used it, you know she isn’t well equipped for life. When the hero of Mayflies by Andrew O’Hagan remarks, with hazy romantic fantasy, that apparently there are homes in England where “people read books to their children and baked cakes for them”, you know in one sentence the vast amount of other things he has missed.

And who can forget the campest line in Henry James — and there’s some competition — when Isabel Archer in The Portrait of a Lady says of her awful husband Gilbert Osmond, “He has a genius for upholstery”?

We know for certain that it’s curtains for the marriage then.

Susie Boyt’s latest novel “Loved and Missed” is out now in paperback (Virago). She will speak at the FTWeekend Festival in London on September 3

Find out about our latest stories first — follow @FTProperty on Twitter or @ft_houseandhome on Instagram

Categories: books

Angela Howes ’15 | Alumni Profiles | Undergraduate English Program | Department of English – brandeis.edu

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Angela HowesThe best word I can think of to define my time at Brandeis would be growth. Enrolled as an English and Creative Writing double-major, I spent a lot of time around books. I also spent a lot of time in tears, agonizing over criticism I received from classmates during Creative Writing workshops and wondering why on earth I had ever wanted to be an author in the first place. That all changed once I met Liz Bradfield. As my Creative Writing professor for two semesters, Liz taught me to harness the pain and the vulnerability inside of me and let it pour out into my writing. And more importantly, she taught me to be unabashedly proud of those words on the page. In my senior year, I came to Liz with an idea for a multimedia Honors Project involving poetry, prose, song, and video, and rather than call me crazy like most professors would have done, she leapt at the chance to mentor me. I can’t imagine ever having the guts to tackle such an involved project prior to my time at Brandeis, and I have Liz to thank for believing in me enough that I learned to believe in myself a little, too.

After graduation, I started working part time at my hometown library, where I would spend the next four years. Per Liz’s advice, I also reached out to Lauren Wolk at the Cultural Center of Cape Cod to see about possibly getting an internship there, and was floored when Lauren asked me to head up a brand new enterprise that she’d been envisioning for years but had never gotten around to starting. Together, Lauren and I launched Bass River Press, a poetry press for local poets from Cape Cod & the Islands. As Editor and Co-Founder of the press, I immersed myself in every stage of the publication process, from reading submissions and selecting finalists to designing the interior layout of the manuscript, performing multiple edits, and eventually, sending it off to the printer. Around the same time, Lauren released Wolf Hollow, a children’s book that has since earned her numerous awards, including a Newbery Honor. Watching her rise to literary stardom inspired me, and motivated me to keep pursuing my own dream of becoming a published author.

In 2018, I started my own freelance editing business, Fine Tuned Editing. Since its inception, I have had the pleasure of editing everything from young adult fantasy novels to self-help and memoirs. Later that same year, I made the terrifying decision to self-publish a novel of my very own, Assignment, which I had actually begun writing while enrolled at Brandeis. That leap led to the self-publication of two more novels to round out the trilogy. While at first my readership was limited to friends and family members, with a little effort and marketing, I was able to get my books into various local bookstores and libraries (of course, the fact that I worked at a library didn’t hurt, either). I still get that anxious pit in my stomach every time someone tells me they’ve read my work, but it’s been well worth it just to see the excitement on the faces of teens when they discover that the author of their new favorite book is seated just across the desk from them.

These days, I now work as Young Adult Librarian at the East Bridgewater Public Library, using my spare moments to edit for clients, work on my writing, and read as much as I humanly can. After experiencing the highs and lows of self-publishing with my first series, I’m giving the traditional publishing route a try, and have been actively submitting queries to literary agents regarding my latest book. It’s been quite the ride, but I look forward to continuing to grow and inch closer to my dreams while also appreciating the little moments of wonder along the way.

Categories: books

Himanta lauds Fadnavis’ ‘selflessness’; Cong leader says, ‘New LK Advani…’ – Hindustan Times

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Congress leader Abhishek Singhvi who represented the Sena in the Supreme Court said the ‘masterstroke’ to demote Fadnavis must be some ‘Chanakya Neeti’
Fadnavis became the deputy chief minister while Eknath Shinde was sworn in as the chief minister. (Satish Bate/HT PHOTO)
Fadnavis became the deputy chief minister while Eknath Shinde was sworn in as the chief minister. (Satish Bate/HT PHOTO)
Published on Jul 01, 2022 09:34 AM IST


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By | Written by Poulomi Ghosh

Assam chief minister Himanta Biswa Sarma who became a key player in the Maharashtra coup after Eknath Shinde took his MLAs to a five-star in Guwahati on Thursday said Devendra Fadnavis’s act of selflessness is exemplary. “I am sure you will play a very crucial role in propelling your state to greater heights of progress,” Himanta Biswa Sarma tweeted after Fadnavis became the deputy CM while Eknath Shinde was sworn in as the chief minister, upsetting all the calculations. Also Read | Eknath Shinde: Thane’s ‘bhai’ is a family man, and a friend in need

BJP leader Nitesh Rane said he has been reading a lot of books on RSS to understand the values of a swayamsevak but Devendra Fadnavis finally taught him what it means to be a swayamsevak.

Also Read | ‘CMs are of 3 types…’: Shashi Tharoor’s veiled dig at Shiv Sena leader Eknath Shinde

While Eknath Shinde credited Fadnavis’s ‘large heart’ for giving him the CM post Congress leader Abhishek Singhvi, who was Sena’s lawyer in the Supreme Court, said BJP’s compromise on the CM seat must be some Chanakya Neeti. “BJP compromise on CM seat which may have been done with a leader of Uddhav’s stature has now been done with Eknath Shinde. Now waiting for IT Cell’s justifications on ‘sheer suddenness’ & ‘masterstroke’ to glorify Fadnavis’s demotion as some Chanakya Neeti,” he tweeted.

“The biggest question of the year still remains that which compulsion made BJP compromise from CM post despite horse-trading and massively spending in Operation Lotus. Nevertheless, we have a new LK Advani in Indian politics. #Devendra_Fadnavis remains the eternal CM in waiting,” Singhvi tweeted.

On Thursday afternoon, Devendra Fadnavis announced that Eknath Shinde will be the chief minister and he won’t be part of the government. But on BJP chief JP Nadda’s request, Fadnavis took the oath as the deputy CM. In 2019, Fadnavis took the oath as chief minister with the support of a group of NCP MLAs led by Ajit Pawar, but had to resign as they did not have the numbers.

Fadnavis becoming the deputy of Eknath Shinde while being the main player behind the BJP coming back into the government of Maharashtra triggered several political reactions. NCP chief Sharad Pawar said Fadnavis did not look happy accepting the post.

“I think Fadnavis has not accepted the number two position happily. His facial expression said it all. (But) He is from Nagpur and he has worked as a `swayamsevak’ (with the RSS) and there, when an order comes, it has to be followed,” Sharad Pawar said about the last-minute change.

As Eknath Shinde kept his flock together at the Guwahati hotel, Fadnavis flew to Delhi and had a word with the top leadership. Coming back to Mumbai, he met Governor BS Koshyari and demanded a floor test which quickened the collapse of the MVA government. As the governor ordered a floor test and the Supreme Court refused to put a stay order, Uddhav Thackeray resigned. Fadnavis was tipped to be the chief minister and sweet celebrations began soon after Thackeray’s resignation.

Fadnavis is not the first former chief minister to accept the post of deputy chief minister. There are instances of Shankarrao Chavan, Shivajirao Patil Nilangekar, Narayan Rane and Ashok Chavan who served as chief ministers and later became junior ministers in the cabinet in another dispensation.



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Freedom to Read is Essential for our Democracy – CT Examiner

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The fervor for removing books from public and school library shelves has intensified since the fall of 2021 and shows no signs of relenting. The latest book to be pulled from the library shelves is a biography of the drag queen, actor, and Emmy-winning TV host, RuPaul. The concern is over a sketch of a person in a corset and boots spelling out the word “viva.” The outfit in the illustration is no more risque than what is worn by popular superheroes like Wonder Woman, whose comics the Colchester library shelves in the children’s collection.

One wonders if the concern might not be the illustration at all, but rather the queer content of the book. After all, concerned parents and selectmen aren’t rushing to protect the children of Connecticut from Wonder Woman’s exposed thighs.

Critiques of Who Is: RuPaul follow the party line of recent book challenges. The material is sexual and inappropriate for children. But it’s only the content of queer books that seems to be the problem. And it isn’t even explicit sex scenes that are being called out. The mere presence of queer characters seems to be enough for parents to call the material sexual. The Colchester library has many books for young people that are shelved in the children and teen collection that include sexual content.

The system has seven copies of a beloved young adult author’s book that contains a sex scene with premature ejaculation. Parents seem to be able to handle explicit heterosexual sex scenes but the mere hint of queerness is abhorrent. Sexualizing RuPaul and other queer people is nothing new. For decades LGBTQ+ people have been reduced to their sexual behavior. There is nothing inherently sexual about the presence of a gay character, just as there is nothing inherently sexual about the presence of a straight character. Nothing in the sketch is more sexual than what children would see from cheerleaders at a sporting event. 

It’s even more alarming that this most recent challenge is of a biography in a well-regarded series of books for young people published by Penguin Random House. It’s especially important for public libraries to provide access to LGBTQ+ nonfiction considering that in a 2017 nationwide study only 41% of students learned anything positive about LGBTQ+ people in their classrooms. Nonfiction books provide valuable role models for LGBTQ+ young people. This is a population that research indicates experiences health and academic challenges due to the discrimination they face in their schools. Other biographies in the Who Is series by Penguin include Albert Einstein, Amelia Earhart, and Barack Obama. Including a queer icon in a book series with American heroes sends an invaluable message of belonging to queer young people. 

Details of this specific case are concerning. Librarians removed the books from the shelf before an official challenge form was submitted. Temporarily removing a book from the shelves may be a step in the review process, but there is no reason to do so before a challenge is even in place. The suggestion that librarians should proactively root through their entire children’s collection on a hunt for supposed sexual material is absurd. That is not how libraries work.

The principles of the American Library Association clearly state that the freedom to read is essential for our democracy. Reclassifying queer books for young people in the adult section is not an appropriate solution either. Queer young people exist. They need access to stories that mirror their experience. And reading books about all genders and sexuality can help cisgender/heterosexual children build empathy. Removing queer books from the children’s sections sends a dangerous message to queer young people that their identities are inherently sexual and inappropriate. 

Even in the case of overt sexuality in a book, a single parent or even a group of parents should not have control over the reading habits of an entire region. This is not a matter of parental control, as some would suggest. It is censorship. If a parent doesn’t want their children to read certain material they can forbid their children from checking out those books from the library. The solution is as simple as that. Some parents want their children to have access to queer books. What happens to their right to parental control if these books are absent from our libraries?

Jesselyn Dreeszen Bowman
Columbia, SC

Bowman is a doctoral student at the University of South Carolina, and holds an MA in Library and Information Science from Simmons University.

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2022 NBA free agency rumors: Live updates as Kevin Durant demands trade; Jalen Brunson to Knicks – CBS Sports

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The 2021-22 season and NBA Draft are both in the books, and now all eyes are on the start of free agency. The speculation and rumors that surround free agency are what make this time of the year truly entertaining. This summer may not have some of the biggest names available on the free-agent market, but it’s still going to be a hectic offseason. Hours before free agency officially kicked off, Kevin Durant requested a trade away from the Brooklyn Nets. One of the NBA’s biggest superstars is now set to change teams this summer, and KD’s trade request will undoubtedly impact how teams handle their offseason business.

NBA free agency started Thursday at 6 p.m. ET, when teams could start negotiating deals with players. However, contracts won’t actually be official until the moratorium period is lifted on July 6. The NBA has reportedly told teams that the salary cap for next season is projected to be set at $123.6 million, up $11.6 million from last year’s $112 million cap figure. Zach LaVine and Deandre Ayton are among the top unrestricted free agents available this offseason. One name off the board is Jalen Brunson, who reportedly agreed to a four-year, $110M deal with the New York Knicks.

For a complete list, check out James Herbert’s breakdown of the 50 top available players

Not many gaudy deals should be expected this summer because as it stands right now, only five teams are projected to have significant cap space to work with. The Detroit PistonsIndiana PacersOrlando MagicPortland Trail BlazersSan Antonio Spurs and New York Knicks are all projected to have the most cap space available. Follow below for all the updates, rumors and key information as we inch closer to the start of NBA free agency.

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Titans hunting massive Haas move; Burton rumours ‘dreamed up’: Transfer Whispers – Fox Sports

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A big Matt Burton rumour has been shut down, but it’s a different story for NSW Blues star Payne Haas who remains in hot demand after his negotiation impasse in Brisbane.

Meanwhile, the Cronulla Sharks have snapped up the younger brother of a Manly star, and another young gun is departing the Dragons.

All that and more in the latest edition of Transfer Whispers!

Round 16

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O'Brien confident despite season start

O’Brien confident despite season start | 03:53

HAAS LINKED WITH TITANS RETURN

It’s one of those rumours that just won’t go away. Payne Haas, who had his immediate contract release request denied by the Broncos earlier this season, is being linked with a move down the road to the Gold Coast Titans.

According to News Corp, the Titans are in a heated race for the bullocking big man, who is set to decide his future at the end of the season.

The 22-year-old prop’s contract in Brisbane runs through 2024, but negotiations over an upgraded deal broke down earlier this year, leading to his bombshell request for an immediate exit.

Brisbane remain hopeful the two parties can come to an agreement. Payne’s brother Klese plays for the Titans, but the biggest barrier to a move to the Gold Coast is unsurprisingly money. The Titans are facing a salary cap squeeze with superstars Tino Fa’asuamaleaui and David Fifita on their books.

But Fifita’s recent form struggles have led to rumours he might jump ship to the incoming Dolphins in 2023, which would leave the Titans with plenty of cash to throw at Haas.

Roosters contract looming for Lodge

Roosters contract looming for Lodge | 01:01

BURTON RUMOURS SHUT DOWN

The Sydney Roosters are struggling, Luke Keary is battling concerning concussion issues, and the predictable question has now been asked.

“There’s murmurs around that they’re [the Roosters] a bit worried about their halves situation — they’re not quite settled with the way the No.6 and No.7 are going. Do they look to someone like a [Matt] Burton?” Braith Anasta asked on NRL 360.

Anasta cited rumours that a big-name half could be coming to Sydney.

“It’s been dreamed up,” Paul Kent answered, shutting down the Burton talk.

Brent Read added: “It was [Cameron] Munster not so long ago.”

And Buzz Rothfield capped it off: “It was Payne Haas the week before. Selwyn Cobbo the week before that, and now it’s Matt Burton.”

Sydney’s on-field performance has triggered these questions, with the premier franchise struggling in a way no-one saw coming before the season started.

Now, with Keary’s troubles, and a start to the season that didn’t exactly inspire confidence in a Keary-Sam Walker combination anyway, the possibility Sydney go shopping isn’t out of the question.

“Well, if Luke Keary is forced to retire… they’re going to have a lot of money up their sleeve,” Read said.

DCE's delightful night out at Brookvale

DCE’s delightful night out at Brookvale | 01:45

SHARKS SNAP UP TAUPAU

While his older brother’s future remains uncertain, Junior Taupau’s looks bright after being snapped up by the Cronulla Sharks.

The younger brother of Manly star Martin Taupau, the 18-year-old forward will join the Sharks next year on a two-year contract after impressing in the Canterbury Bulldogs’ set-up.

That’s according to a News Corp report, which lists the Endeavour Sports High student at 188cm and 104kg.

Taupau was a standout in the Bulldogs’ Harold Matthews Cup team in 2021, and was part of Canterbury’s SG Ball side.

Martin meanwhile is off-contract at the end of this season, with no call made on his playing future beyond 2022.

MORE NRL NEWS

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TRANSFER CENTRE: Dolphins lock in Panthers playmaker

JIMMY BRINGS: Keary concerns growing as Tigers tame journos

‘WHEN TIMES GET DESPERATE’: Roosters Lodge signing a final bid

Truth or lie? Gutho and Moses TESTED

Truth or lie? Gutho and Moses TESTED | 07:38

YOUNG DRAGON POACHED

Another one bites the dust.

Not for the first time this year, the Dragons have lost a rising star to an NRL rival.

On this occasion, it’s promising prop Jack Burrows exiting the club, set to join the Parramatta Eels on a two-year deal, according to the Wide World of Sports.

Burrows played for the St Gregory’s College side in this year’s National Schoolboy Championships, and is tipped for big things.

Burrows’ exit comes not long after Jack Bostock signed on for 2023 and beyond with Wayne Bennett and the Dolphins.

Categories: books